Google’s Gaming Service: Patents, Code Snippets and Other Clues Suggest Chromecast Link – Variety

Google’s Gaming Service: Patents, Code Snippets and Other Clues Suggest Chromecast Link – Variety

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Google is set to unveil its take on the future of gaming at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) in San Francisco next week.
Little is known about Google’s plans, with speculation ranging from a cloud gaming service to a full-fledged game console. However, patents filed by the company, code snippets, and other clues suggest that the service may be closely tied to another key Google product: its Chromecast streaming adapter.Ahead of a Tuesday press event, Google has been hinting that its video game plans include a hardware component. Most notably, the company launched a placeholder page on the Google Store, which it uses to sell its own phones, smart speakers, and streaming devices. What’s more, a recently unearthed patent shows a game controller, featuring a microphone button for access to the Google Assistant. Google did not respond to a request for comment.We also know that Google has been experimenting with a cloud gaming service. .



Called Project Stream, the service allowed users to play “Assassin’s Creed Odyssey” without installing it on their PCs, simply streaming it from Google’s servers. The product, to be unveiled next week, is expected to combine both new gaming hardware as well as the cloud streaming service.RelatedHow all of this may fit together was first described in a patent recently granted to the company for “independent control of interactive streaming media.” That patent, which Google first applied for back in 2015, lists some of the key people behind Google’s Chromecast streaming media player as inventors, including Google Home VP Rishi Chandra, former Google Home Hardware design director Michael Sundermeyer, and Chromecast engineering team lead Majd Bakar.On the surface, the patent seems to be all about remote media control, similar to the way Chromecast works, with references to “a simple video decoding device” without “physical interfaces for accepting human input.” But dig into the details, and take a look at the illustrations, and it quickly becomes clear that this is all about gaming.From the patent:“In one non-limiting example, a mobile device can establish a streaming session in a cloud-based gaming environment. (…) In some implementations, a user can access streaming media (e.g., ....

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